Conference Topics

Commercial farming, Social Equity and Food Security

Successful entry and retention of international markets for livestock and livestock commodities depends on timely and sustainable supply of safe high quality commodities to these target markets. The presence and magnitude of supply-side constraints have a debilitating effect on market entry and retention. Successful entry and retention of international markets for livestock and livestock commodities depends on timely and sustainable supply of safe high quality commodities to these target markets. The presence and magnitude of supply-side constraints have a debilitating effect on market entry and retention.

Technologies that help to remove supply-side constraints are critical for increasing the productivity of livestock. Policies to enhance technology adoption must focus on facilitating and promoting smallholder access to existing and new low-cost technologies. On this theme the three pillars of development are included which are social equity, global health and the environment.

Food security embraces food production, stability of supply and access to food. Livestock play a role in all three aspects: they make a significant contribution to food production through the provision of high value protein-rich animal products; they indirectly support crop production through draught power and manure; they stabilize supply; and finally, they are the most significant source of income and store of wealth for smallholders, thereby providing access to food.

This theme is expected to addresses sectoral challenges and ensures that safe, sustainable and affordable livestock products and services contribute equitably to human development and well-being.

This particular theme will engage particularly policy makers, animal production experts, environmental experts and economists.

Livestock marketing

Over the years, lack of market-orientation of the livestock sector has shadowed and demeaned the role it can play in contributing to the African economy. The comparative advantages of the unique genetic resources, the agro-ecology they live in and the associated production systems have not been exploited appropriately and adequately. The share of government investment in livestock research, education and extension services and other development activities has been relatively minimal. With the basic target of tackling the crucial issue of improving the effectiveness of livestock marketing, this theme fills an important gap in the value chain about livestock marketing in and out of Africa.

This particular theme aims to bridge the gap between markets and producers and to meet market information needs for livestock producers and other stakeholders by developing the technical and human capacity.

In most African countries, the marketing of livestock and livestock products is underdeveloped. The major problems are the traditional management systems which are not market oriented, underdeveloped marketing systems and poor infrastructure, poor financial facility, and presence of cross-border trade. In addition, the marketing system, major actors and characteristics is not adequately known.

Over the years, lack of market-orientation of the livestock sector has shadowed and demeaned the role it can play in contributing to the African economy. The comparative advantages of the unique genetic resources, the agro-ecology they live in and the associated production systems have not been exploited appropriately and adequately. The share of government investment in livestock research, education and extension services and other development activities has been relatively minimal.

This particular sub section of the congress will allow Public-Private Dialogue to enhance marketing of livestock and livestock products and ensure African nation's benefit from their resources. The pressing priority is to develop domestic and intra-regional livestock trade. Whilst great attention is normally paid to export potential, review of the figures suggests Africa's capacity to export livestock products to global markets will boom in the coming few years.

This particular theme engages marketing professionals, animal production workers, economists, policy makers, government officials, non-government organizations, and other related professionals with an attempt to yield the maximum output from the dialogue.

Improved animal health and standardization

Countries that are currently exporting beef to the EU market are those with a clear policy on animal disease control. To target such markets, countries must strengthen national Departments of Veterinary Services by equipping them well to undertake routine disease control and surveillance operations. They must also develop and constantly test their national emergency preparedness plans to ensure that they can effectively respond to sporadic outbreaks of disease.

Countries that are currently exporting beef to the EU market are those with a clear policy on animal disease control. To target such markets, countries must strengthen national Departments of Veterinary Services by equipping them well to undertake routine disease control and surveillance operations. They must also develop and constantly test their national emergency preparedness plans to ensure that they can effectively respond to sporadic outbreaks of disease.

If African smallholder livestock producers are to supply quality commodities to international markets on a timely and regular basis, a proper incentive structure that enables them to effectively participate in input markets is required.

It is clear from a number of detailed studies that lack of compliance with SPS measures is an important factor influencing the ability of African livestock producers to exploit export opportunities in markets in developed countries.

This theme engages participants from various sectors including animal health workers, para-veterinarians, veterinarians and policy makers in every step along the livestock value chain.

Animal feed systems, breeding and overall management

Livestock nutrition is fundamental to improving productivity and competitiveness. Nutrition also plays a vital role in supporting an animal's capacity to resist illness. A key challenge for Africa is how to intensify production using locally-available feed, when that feed often lacks quality. With increasing rates of child malnutrition, increased utilization of land for bio-fuel production and increases in cereal prices as oil-based input costs rise, Africa needs to maximize its use of human inedible feeds. This means improved ruminant nutrition. Livestock nutrition is fundamental to improving productivity and competitiveness. Nutrition also plays a vital role in supporting an animal's capacity to resist illness. A key challenge for Africa is how to intensify production using locally-available feed, when that feed often lacks quality. With increasing rates of child malnutrition, increased utilization of land for bio-fuel production and increases in cereal prices as oil-based input costs rise, Africa needs to maximize its use of human inedible feeds. This means improved ruminant nutrition.

Recognition and understanding of factors that lead to successful adoption of feed and other agricultural technologies is constantly growing. A key objective of the this theme is to identify opportunities and binding constraints as the first step in designing more effective support and Investments in animal feed production and management.

Breeds of domesticated farm animal species are also the primary biological capital for livestock development. Livestock output growth in the past century has concentrated on a very small number of breeds worldwide, a process associated with significant erosion of existing biological diversity. Such diversity loss, if left to continue its course, will seriously reduce options to respond to changing requirements of the sector. This and many more breeding and genetic issues will be presented on this sub-section of the congress. Additionally, other managemental factors will also be discussed.

This sub-theme of the congress will engage professionals ranging from animal nutritionists to crop agriculture researchers. Further it will engage breeding specialists that work in identifying better productivity through genetic selection.

Poultry forum

The world's poultry industry is the most innovative and progressive segment of animal agriculture. Subject to constant change, the industry must stay well-informed to maintain an edge. Prana Events, with such understanding works to ensure that the poultry industry receives the most up-to-date information about the various topics that impact it.

Background

The African continent is not in a prominent position on the world poultry map. Yet a number of countries are slowly moving towards higher domestic production, both in meat and eggs. Market orientated commercial production methods are gradually gaining importance.

Although Africa is the continent least responsible for climate change, it will be very vulnerable to the effects, such as reduced agricultural production, food insecurity, the increased incidence of drought and the spread of disease.

Compared to its population, Africa is only playing a minor role in the global poultry industry. In 2009, Africa shared about 14% of the global population but contributed only 4.5% to global chicken meat and 4.1% to egg production. So it is not surprising that African countries had a high negative balance of trade with chicken meat. In 2008, 666,000 tones had to be imported to meet the domestic demand. The import volume for shell eggs for consumption was much smaller. Only about 32,000 tones had to be imported. The main reasons for the comparatively low production volume are the lack of know-how, capital and high-quality feed as well as the political instability in many countries.

Between 1990 and 2009 the production volume of chicken meat almost doubled. The highest absolute and relative growth rates were in northern African countries, followed by southern African. The lowest production increase was to be found in middle African countries which together produced only about 71,000 tons of poultry meat. A very low income, high poverty rates and an overall low development status are the main steering factors.

A closer look at the situation per country reveals that the regional concentration of chicken meat production is quite high. The ten leading countries shared 82% of the overall production volume in 2009. South Africa was in a leading position with a contribution of 26.9% to African chicken meat production, followed by Egypt and Morocco. It is worth mentioning that five northern African countries ranked among the top ten chicken meat producing countries.

Hen egg production grew much slower than that of chicken meat. Between 1990 and 2009, the production volume increased by 1 million tones or 68.4%. The highest absolute growth rate was in northern Africa with 380,000 tones, the highest relative increase was southern Africa with 112%. In eastern and middle Africa only minor changes in egg production could be observed in the analyzed time period.

Promising perspectives

Poultry products are in an advantageous position because of the excellent feed conversion rate of broilers and laying hens and the fact that no religious taboos constrain the consumption of chicken meat and eggs. They also have the advantage that they need no refrigeration as whole birds can be consumed in one meal, a difference from beef and pork.

So it can be expected that the per capita consumption of poultry products will increase over the next decades, at least in countries with a dynamic economic development and a growing per capita income. This will be mainly the case in South Africa, the northern African countries, Nigeria and some countries in east Africa

It can be observed that market oriented production, in eggs as well as in poultry meat, is gaining in importance. Local breeds are increasingly substituted by hybrids. Local breeds are, however, still kept in backyard flocks.

Emerging Africa

Africa represents what is called “frontier” markets. Historically, no one had been able to get much exposure to the continental economy, but now it is becoming investable thanks to greater integrity in the general business environment, a number of infrastructural improvements, and greater stability overall thanks to social, economical and political reforms. And because these markets are starting from such a low base, they’re growing very quickly.

Right now frontier markets in Africa have between 5-7 percent GDP growths annually, as opposed to the developed markets, which aren’t growing much at all. In the emerging markets there’s a mix of faster and slower growing economies, but in the aggregate they’re not growing as fast as the frontier markets.

What makes Africa so interesting in particular is that there is massive change taking place. This is a region with one billion people, and by 2040 the continent will have the largest population of working-age people on the planet. There is very little debt and a large amount of resources. Recent growth has been broad-based across all sectors, and investment in infrastructure is visibly picking up.

Africa is obviously rich in commodities: oil, iron ore, livestock, copper, platinum, gold. If one considers China’s investment, for instance, one-third of the country’s foreign investment in the last five years has gone into Africa and the Middle East. And if seen at a map of where China has invested, it mirrors almost exactly where the natural resources are. All of the country’s investment in Africa has effectively gone into African natural resources.

The Forum

The world’s poultry industry is the most innovative and progressive segment of animal agriculture. Subject to constant change, the industry must stay well-informed to maintain an edge. Prana Events, with such understanding works to ensure that the poultry industry receives the most up-to-date information about the various topics that impact it.

Aimed at live production managers, owners, veterinarians, and service representatives, the Poultry Production and Health forum examines the most effective methods to maintain healthy birds. It describes the latest developments in disease prevention and treatment, along with reiterating time-tested management methods.

The forum examines the best practices, new ideas, and government regulations in the sector. The forum is expected to empower and capacitate the human resource in the sector. Regardless of how sophisticated equipment and machines may be, the success of a company ultimately depends upon its people. People are essential to manage and maintain the complex systems of today, and people must make vital day-to-day decisions.

Opening Time

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Thursday, October 17: 10:00am – 06:00pm
Friday, October 18:       10:00am – 06:00pm
Saturday, October 19:  10:00am – 04:00pm

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Prana Events is a full-service event management, marketing and consulting firm based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The company is established with an aim to support the event industry with Knowledge, technology and solutions .

Under the strong leadership of the founder and Managing Director - Mr. Nebeyu Lemma, who has a decade of expertise in managing international trade fairs and conferences, the company is staffed with young, hardworking and creative professionals that have high value and talent for their appointed position...Learn More